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Benefits of PEMF Therapy for Frozen Shoulder

Research in orthopedic medicine indicates that PEMF therapy for frozen shoulder may be a better option than turning to surgery so quickly.

Many individuals who research PEMF therapy do so because they suffer from inflammation and pain on a consistent basis.

Old sports injuries or new ones depending up their severity can lead to a visit with the orthopedic doctor. The end result is often a prescription for physical therapy. When that doesn’t work, surgery is recommended.

This article will discuss the outcomes of specific studies that show promising results, indicating that PEMF therapy for frozen shoulder may be a better option from day one.

Why PEMF Therapy for Frozen Shoulder is Effective

While most doctors do not prescribe PEMF therapy for ailments and injuries, some orthopedic doctors have been willing to trial PEMF devices.

One troubling condition for all ages is frozen shoulder. The only option for decades has been surgery. The procedure is rather harsh, with the doctor and assistants essentially pulling the shoulder apart.

Frozen shoulder means just that; it’s as if the shoulder is in a block of ice, unable to move. PEMF therapy is beneficial to all cells throughout your body.

The most basic foundation of PEMF therapy is that it stimulates cells. In fact, pulsed electromagnetic fields help the body to heal itself.

The human body has been failing to do so properly since the electromagnetic fields around the earth have been dissipating.

When these gentle pulses from a PEMF device are used, the cells, nerves, and tissues receive gentle stimulation which in turn promotes regeneration.

How then does PEMF therapy for frozen shoulder actually work?

An independent study published in Pub Med, proves the efficacy of electrotherapy for frozen shoulder. This condition is also known in the medical community as “adhesive capsulitis”.

This study used controlled groups, both in a clinical setting and without. The goal was to determine if modalities using electrotherapies would work as well as a placebo.

The second goal was to determine if it was also beneficial to use electrotherapy (or PEMF therapy) in conjunction with physical or manual therapy.

The two types of electrotherapy used in this study included:

  1. Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLT)
  2. Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Therapy (PEMF)

It’s important to note that using only a few individuals for a study would not warrant a high enough success rating to prove the efficacy of these modalities.

This study included 1,249 participants. There were nine trials total for this group. The outcome from the study has been shared below directly from Pub Med.

The two main questions of the review were investigated in nine trials. Low quality evidence from one trial (40 participants) indicated that LLLT for six days may result in improvement at six days. Eighty per cent (16/20) of participants reported treatment success with LLLT compared with 10% (2/20) of participants receiving placebo (risk ratio (RR) 8.00, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.11 to 30.34; absolute risk difference 70%, 95% CI 48% to 92%). No participants in either group reported adverse events.We were uncertain whether PEMF for two weeks improved pain or function more than placebo at two weeks because of the very low quality evidence from one trial (32 participants). Seventy-five per cent (15/20) of participants reported pain relief of 30% or more with PEMF compared with 0% (0/12) of participants receiving placebo (RR 19.19, 95% CI 1.25 to 294.21; absolute risk difference 75%, 95% CI 53% to 97%). Fifty-five per cent (11/20) of participants reported total recovery of joint function with PEMF compared with 0% (0/12) of participants receiving placebo (RR 14.24, 95% CI 0.91 to 221.75; absolute risk difference 55%, 95% CI 31 to 79).Moderate quality evidence from one trial (63 participants) indicated that LLLT plus exercise for eight weeks probably results in greater improvement when measured at the fourth week of treatment, but a similar number of adverse events, compared with placebo plus exercise.

With pain relief of more than 30%, that is a good result for a short time period. Additionally, it reads that fifty-five percent (11 out of 20 patients), reported total recovery of joint function with PEMF.

PEMF therapy can be a great complementary therapy to your current treatment plan, and it would be wise to ask your doctor to monitor your progress using a PEMF device.

It opens up the dialogue of a more natural approach, and it’s beneficial when a patient can cut back on their use of pain medication.

PEMF therapy for frozen shoulder is clearly a sound choice. Today, there are numerous PEMF devices available for one to choose from.

Using PEMF Therapy for Frozen Shoulder Daily Gets Best Results

Using any modality consistently will aid in you getting a better result. The same is true when using a PEMF device. If you dedicate your time to using this therapy, you’ll begin to heal faster and better.

Frozen shoulder is often the result of poor healing after surgery, or severe pain that discourages the individual from moving their arm.

Physical therapy and PEMF therapy can be super effective when they are used together. Daily use of a PEMF device will give you the best results.

Conduct your own online research and compare the benefits of devices before you make a final decision.

You’ll soon discover that using “PEMF therapy for frozen shoulder” daily could mean a complete recovery, helping you avoid surgery.

PEMF therapy for frozen shoulder

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